Himalayan Languages and Cultures - Spring 2014

HLC_2014

Spring 2014
Himalayan Languages and Cultures
Anthropology (ANTH) 353/553 and South Asian Studies (SAST) 369/569
Tuesday, 3:30-5:20pm, WLH (William L. Harkness Hall), Room 001

Brief Outline of Class

Envisioned as a journey or ‘trek’ through this rugged region, the core intellectual work of the class has been designed to support students who wish to develop sophisticated analytical tools for understanding complex cultural, linguistic and political identities. While focused on the Himalayas, this seminar offers participants insights into issues of classification and categorization that affect us all. Who defines the scope of a region such as the Himalayas, and how are the people within its boundaries categorized and ordered? Are language, caste and ethnicity primary and personal labels of attachment and belonging, or are these identities rather imposed by the State? What is a ‘mother tongue’, and do you have to speak it to claim it as your own? What happens when nations disagree about the extent of their borders or the scope of their territories? For example, why does Mount Everest have so many different names and which countries claim it as their own? Who first climbed the mountain, and why? And was the historical Buddha born in India or Nepal, neither or both?

Class Aim and Objectives

Envisioned as a journey or ‘trek’ through this rugged region, the core intellectual work of the class has been designed to support students who wish to develop sophisticated analytical tools for understanding complex cultural, linguistic and political identities. While focused on the Himalayas, this seminar offers participants insights into issues of classification and categorization that affect us all.

Who defines the scope of a region such as the Himalayas, and how are the people within its boundaries categorized and ordered? Are language, caste and ethnicity primary and personal labels of attachment and belonging, or are these identities rather imposed by the State? What is a ‘mother tongue’, and do you have to speak it to claim it as your own? What happens when nations disagree about the extent of their borders or the scope of their territories? For example, why does Mount Everest have so many different names and which countries claim it as their own? Who first climbed the mountain, and why? And was the historical Buddha born in India or Nepal, neither or both?

Yale students click here to access a detailed syllabus.

Twitter: markturin